Quick navigation menu :

  1. Go to the content
  2. Go to main section's menu
  3. Go to Search tool
  4. Go to Language menu
  5. Go to Help menu
  6. Go to modules
  7. Go to the list of keyboard shortcuts

Help menu :

  1. Sanofi Worldwide |
     
  2. Our Websites |
     
  3. Global Business Websites |
     
  4. Contact us |
  5. Sitemap |
  6. Help
  1. Font size

    Reduce font size Increase font size  
 
 

Deep Vein Thrombosis

Content :

Deep Vein Thrombosis

Deep Vein Thrombosis

Also known as the "economy class syndrome", deep vein thrombosis has the potential to develop into pulmonary embolism and can be fatal in serious cases. Patients who have suffered from stroke or those who are bedridden long-term are especially prone to this condition.

 

Deep vein thrombosis refers to blood clots formed in a deep vein. It mostly occurs in the upper leg or lower limb, although it may also affect other parts of the body. Common symptoms of deep vein thrombosis include swellings, pain, and redness or discoloration of the limbs. Furthermore, a warm sensation may be felt in painful or swollen areas.

Causes:

  • Primarily caused by a slow-moving venous blood circulation. This commonly occurs in patients who have undergone major surgical operations, who are bedridden long-term, who suffer from heart failure and those who have raised intra-abdominal pressure.

  • Unusual changes in the body state causing an increased risk for blood clot formation. For example: trauma, major burns, labour, increased blood thickness from severe dehydration, sharp increases in blood platelet counts following total pancreatomy, malignant tumours at internal organs, adverse effects of drugs and infections.           

It is noteworthy that should any blood clot break off and detach from its site of formation, it may get circulated to the lungs causing pulmonary embolism, a severe and fatal disease. Clots formed in the upper legs are usually more easily detached and will pose a higher risk for pulmonary embolism than clots from other parts of the body.

Fatalities can be prevented by drug administration

At present, anti-coagulant drugs are widely used to treat deep vein thrombosis. These include low molecular weight heparin injections and oral warfarin tablets. Among these, low molecular weight heparins are proven to be more effective than traditional medications in reducing the instances of deep vein thrombosis in stroke patients. For oral warfarin tablets, it is vital that patients adhere strictly to the dosage instructions as prescribed by the doctor, and avoid all vigorous physical activities that may lead to injuries. A course of anti-coagulant therapy usually lasts three to six months.

Useful links

 

Updated January 01, 2008